Homeopathy: Finding the Cure in the Cause

How Can Homeopathy Help?

Like cures like. That’s the concept behind homeopathy, a centuries-old system that stimulates the body’s innate healing ability. In 1796, Samuel Hahnemann, M.D. observed that Cinchona Bark, a medicinal plant used by native people in South America to treat malaria, could also caused the symptoms of malaria in healthy people. After testing the theory on himself, he continued his research, establishing the “dynamic” effect of a homeopathic substance: The small amount of the disease-causing agent in the remedy stimulates the healing process and with fewer side effects.

Let’s look at the example with regular onion. You remember how you feel when you peel and chop fresh onion in the kitchen? The eyes are burning and tearing, your nose starts running and all you want to do is to get out from that kitchen to the fresh air. Now, imagine you have  seasonal allergy, hay fever, and your symptoms include burning, itchy eyes, runny nose and all those symptoms get better on the fresh air. In this case, the small quantity of onion (Allium Cepa), prepared according to homeopathic traditions will help to alleviate those symptoms.

Whether you have an acute illness, such as a cold or flu, or a chronic illness, such as chronic sinusitis or even thyroid disease, homeopathy can play an essential role in your wellness. Within the homeopathic model, as in most holistic approaches to health, illness is believed to be caused by imbalance within a person. Employing the system of “like cures like” — often along with other therapies — balance is restored; the body begins to function as it should and the symptoms of disease go away.

A homeopathic physician will conduct an extensive interview with a patient, identify potential remedies, and closely monitor a patient’s progress until the person is well. During treatment, symptoms may come and go as the body heals. While it’s a very safe therapy, it’s important to work with a practitioner who has been fully trained in order to achieve the best results possible.

Elena Klimenko, MD, is a board certified internist and certified in clinical homeopathy and functional medicine, will help you decide which homeopathic medicine is right for you. In her practice, she uses lifestyle modification and natural remedies, such as homeopathy, herbs and food based supplements  to address the root cause of your medical symptoms and guide your body towards optimal health. Call today to speak with Dr. Klimenko at 212-696- HEAL(4325).

References

  • Cody, G.W. & Hascall, H., “The History of Naturopathic Medicine: The Emergence and Evolution of an American School of Healing” in Pizzorno, J.E. & Murray, M. T. Textbook of Natural Medicine (2013). p. 37.
  • Lange, A. & Gaylord, S.A., “Homeopathy” in Pizzorno, J.E. & Murray, M. T. Textbook of Natural Medicine (2013). p. 314-32

Food & You: The Body-Mind Connection

“Food for the body is not enough. There must be food for the soul.” – Dorothy Day

There’s no doubt about it: what we eat, and how much we eat, has a direct impact on our physical health. But did you know that those same choices also influence mood, mental alertness, memory, and emotional wellbeing? Food can act as medicine, have a neutral effect, or it can be a poison to the body and mind.

When food acts as poison, it creates inflammation, which alters the body’s balance of nutrients, hormones, and neurotransmitters. This directly affects your body’s ability to manage and heal from stress or illness.

While some body-mind effects are due to naturally occurring nutrient content in food, much is due to hidden additives. Below, are four common culprits. If you’re experiencing symptoms that interfere with your quality of living, talk with your holistic health practitioner about the role these or other foods may play in your health.

Foods that Impact Body-Mind Well being Caffeine:

The most socially accepted psychoactive substance in the world, caffeine is used to boost alertness, enhance performance, and even treat apnea in premature infants. Caffeine is frequently added to other foods, so be mindful of total consumption. Too much caffeine (500-600 mg daily) interferes with sleep quality which affects energy, concentration, and memory. It can aggravate other health conditions, cause digestive disturbances, and worsen menstrual symptoms and anxiety.

Food Dye:

The brightly colored, processed and packaged foods we buy come with a rainbow of health risks. Listed on ingredient labels as “Blue 2,” or “Citrus Red,” food dye has been documented to contain cancer-causing agents (e.g., benzidine). They’re also associated with allergic reactions and hyperactivity in children. Dyes are sometimes used to enhance skin color of fruits and veggies, but not in organic produce. A number of dyes have been banned from use in foods and cosmetics around the world.

Sugars:

Increased sugar consumption (as much as 30% over the last three decades for American adults), is linked to decreased intake of essential nutrients and associated with obesity, diabetes, inflammatory disease, joint pain and even schizophrenia. Too much dietary sugar can result in blood sugar fluctuations, causing mood swings, anxiety, irritability, headaches, and increased depression. Sugars that can act as poison include High Fructose Corn Syrup, table sugar, artificial and “natural” sweeteners.

MSG:

Monosodium glutamate is a flavor enhancer common in packaged and prepared foods. Although the FDA considers MSG “generally safe,” some individuals experience a complex of physical and mental symptoms after eating MSG-containing foods. Symptoms vary but can include headache, sweating, nausea, chest pain, heart palpitations, and overstimulation of the central nervous system which can lead to alterations in sleep, mood, and immunity.

Becoming aware of your food choices, why you make them, and how you feel mentally and physically is important. It is the first step in understanding your personal body-mind food connection. Your integrative or functional medicine practitioner may ask you to keep a mind-body food journal to provide a clear picture of how your food choices affect your health.

Elena Klimenko, MD, a certified functional medicine physician, will help you choose the right course of action to improve your nutrition. In her practice, she uses lifestyle modification, herbal and food based supplements to address the root cause of your medical symptoms. Call today to find out more about functional medicine and speak with Dr. Klimenko at 212-696- HEAL(4325).

Is Your Home Making You Sick?

Is Your Home Making You Sick?

3 Tips for Staying Healthy at Home

By Charlotte Meier

While you may not like to consider the possibility that your home could make you and your family sick, there is a very good chance that it is, especially if your family members have eye, nose, and throat irritation, congestion, or a rash that dissipates an hour or two after leaving home. While older homes typically have more materials that cause illness, newer homes also may be responsible for making you sick. Below, we share a few tips for helping you and your family stay healthy at home.

1. Get a home inspection

One of the first steps you should take to ensure that you reside in a healthy home is to schedule a home inspection with a certified inspector. Professional home inspectors examine both the exterior and interior of the home and check the electrical, plumbing, and ventilation systems, the home’s structure, and the paint and other finish elements. Inspectors also look for evidence of pests and rodents. If the inspector finds a major issue, he will suggest inspections by specialists who can give a more detailed report on the problems.

The home inspection will guide you toward repairs that you can make to solve any problems the inspector uncovers. For example, the inspector may have discovered that there is lead-based paint in your home. If the paint is in good condition and the surface of the paint hasn’t been broken, your family’s health is not in serious danger. But, if the lead paint is deteriorating, flaking, or leaving lead dust, your family is at increased risk of lead poisoning.

If you do have lead paint, immediately clean up paint chips, clean your child’s play areas, and dust on a regular basis. Do not wear shoes in your home, and contact a certified lead abatement contractor immediately, because painting over lead paint does not eliminate the problem. These certified contractors will either remove the paint, seal it, or enclose it safely. If you need assistance in finding a certified lead professional, contact the National Lead

Information Center at 1-800-424-LEAD.

2. Test for radon

As many as 20,000 people die each year from lung cancer caused by radon; in fact, radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer. Testing is the only way to determine the radon levels in your home, and you can purchase a radon test kit online or at a home improvement store. Be sure to follow the instructions in the kit carefully and to test in the lowest lived-in level of your home. Keep in mind that for the test to be most effective, you need to maintain closed-house conditions for 12 hours before the test and during the duration of the test.

If you discover that your home has radon levels over 4 pCi/L, the EPA’s recommended action level for radon exposure, you should take steps to reduce it to acceptable levels as soon as possible. DIY repairs to reduce radon levels include sealing gas entry points, using natural ventilation, burning a candle, and turning on ceiling fans. For higher levels of radon, use a fan with a positive ion generator.

3. Avoid carpeting and engineered wood products

If you are building or remodeling, or if you are looking for materials to remove from your home to improve your family’s health, avoid carpeting and engineered wood products. Carpeting may be soft, but most wall-to-wall carpeting manufactured outside of the U.S. is synthetic; it’s materials put toxins that have been linked to cancer, nerve damage, respiratory issues, and immune system damage into your home.

Engineered wood products are manufactured with glue, and the adhesives and bonding agents emit pollutants such as formaldehyde into the air inside your home. Many cabinets, furniture, wall paneling, and kitchen counters are constructed with these wood products, so it is much better for your family’s health if you purchase natural, solid wood products that contain significantly fewer, if any, chemicals.

It is possible that your home is making you and your family sick. If you have even the slightest inkling that your home is not as healthy as you’d like, you should follow the tips we have suggested here. You may just find that your family stays healthy if you make corrections to your home.

Acne

Acne

How Functional Medicine can help treat acne.

For most people, acne occurs during their teen years due to hormonal changes, but disappears soon after this stage. Some people, however, may struggle with acne for most of their adult life. Conventional medicine provides little more than face creams that hardly ever seem to work. Is there no solution for acne?

Fortunately, functional medicine provides another option. The underlying philosophy of functional medicine states that the way to relieve symptoms is by focusing on combating the root cause of the issue, not the symptoms. In this case, acne may just be recurring symptom of a bigger issue.

When one system of the body is out of balance, it may throw other seemingly unrelated systems out of balance as well. This is why it is important to find a practitioner that will explore possible imbalances in your whole body, to achieve long-lasting results. There are many possible causes for acne, beyond what conventional medicine tends to believe. These include hormonal imbalances, liver toxicity, gastro-intestinal issues like dysbiosis, small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) or food sensitivity.

Certified Functional Medicine practitioner Dr. Elena Klimenko, will work with you to discover the underlying cause of your particular condition and restore the balance to your body systems. She uses safe, natural approaches such as homeopathy, nutrition, light therapy and excellent skin care treatments to help you on the road to a healthier and beautiful you.

Find out what Dr. Klimenko can do for you by calling 212-696-4325

Rhodiola Rosea

Rhodiola Rosea

Who does not want to have better mood, stronger libido, and stronger nervous system, feel stronger, resist to infections and tolerate stress better and live longer?

If you don’t want at least one of those qualities, you probably don’t need to read the rest of the article…

For all others, let me introduce you to the “queen” of the herbs Rhodiola Rosea. To be more exact, the root of the herb possesses the multitude of the medicinal qualities outlined earlier. If I ever get stranded on the deserted island and I have only one supplement to take, it’d be Rhodiola Rosea!

Rhodiola root (Rhodiola Rosea, Arctic Root, Golden Root) was first discovered in Russia, where the locals of Siberia were known to possess a strong health and survive severe climate conditions. It was later been used in the traditional medicine of many countries including Russia, Scandinavia and Middle Asia.

Since 1969 Rhodiola has been included in the list of official Russian medicine. It is regarded as a tonic and stimulant and used to increase physical endurance, attention span, memory, work productivity and resistance to high altitude sickness.

Other indications include fatigue, anemia, impotence, infections (including cold and influenza), nervous system disorders (mild depression and stress), headache and to enhance longevity and fertility.

Rhodiola has multiple key ingredients that are responsible for the myriad of therapeutic properties (rosavins and salidroside are among the most important). The particular ratio of those components (3:1) gives the most therapeutic efficacy. The interesting thing is that not all types of Rodiola are the same and the most balanced and therapeutic species from all existing Rodiolas appears to be Rodeola Rosea. Different parts of the plant (leaves, flowers, stems and roots) have different proportions of the therapeutic components. Many studies were done to find which part is the richest in the medicinal qualities and the roots invariably come as a winner.

The main indication for use of Rhodiola is adaptogenic, tonic and antioxidant effect.

General indications: Rhodiola Rosea extract is classified as an adaptogen due to its ability to increase your body’s resistance to a variety of chemical, biological, and physical sources of stress. It is commonly recommended to people who are faced with large amounts of physical and/or mental stress. Sounds like any person leaving in New York or any large city.

Detoxification: Several studies have shown that Rhodiola Rosea can help to detoxify our body by increasing protein synthesis and removing ammonia from the blood. It also increases blood supply to the muscles and the brain, and therefore proven to improve athletic performance.

Brian support: Due to its ability to supply blood to the brain many people use Rhodiola Rosea during times of studying and taking exams. Rhodiola rosea also improves the brain’s ability to deal with stress by increasing serotonin in the brain (hypothalamus and midbrain), increasing endorphins, moderating the release of opioid peptides that occur as a part of dealing with stress response, and protecting the brain and heart by reducing the stress related production of stress initiating hormone (corticotrophin releasing factor).

Rhodiola is a wonderful herb for mental focus and brain activity. The results, observed in several clinical studies demonstrate enhanced mental performance, learning, attention span, and memory. It has been widely used as an antidepressant, working alone or adjunctively with other antidepressants and some patients find it more effective than prescription antidepressants like SSRI’s or St. John’s Wort.

Rhodiola’s indications: Fatigue, Physical stress, Debility, Increase of concentration, mental performance and memory, Failure to thrive, Impotence and infertility, Convalescence, Chronic immune deficiency, Chronic fatigue syndrome, Fibromyalgia, Recovery from viral infections, Tonic for the elderly

Athletic performance: Rhodiola Rosea is able to increase physical work capacity. It improves strength, recovery time, endurance, and coordination. Clinical studies discovered Rhodiola to be more effective than Siberian ginseng at enhancing adaptation to physical stress.

Fertility: Rhodiola has been shown great results in enhancing fertility in women, even among those that have failed to conceive with standard fertility drugs; It also improves sexual performance in men with erectile dysfunction and/or premature ejaculation. It also enhances thyroid and adrenal function without causing hyperfunction of those organs.

Heart Function: Rhodiola is a very effective anti-arrhythmia/tachycardia agent. It also increases the energy efficiency and energy reserves of the heart by balancing the heart’s nerve inputs (sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems).

Remember, if you have time and money for only one herb, make it Rodeola Rosea. Keep in mind, the quality of herbs can vary immensely from one manufacturer to another. I use and trust MediHerb as a source of my herbs. This Australian company does vigorous quality control to test efficacy and purity of the herbal sources and I get consistent results when I use their product.

Feel free to call our office with any questions about this article or to get the best quality Rodeola Rosea.

Stay Healthy Wealthy & Wise,

Elena Klimenko, MD

 

Don't Let Food Labels Give You Indigestion

Don’t Let Food Labels Give You Indigestion

Food labels have been a topic of discussion with my patients for many years.

When you are walking the grocery store aisles, you probably flip over a few items to read the nutrition labels, but do you understand what you’re looking at? While overall, people around are well education about the topic, please remember these helpful tips:

Nutrition information on the label is provided for one serving of a food or beverage. Many products contain more than one serving. Example: standard size bottle of ice-tea contains 2 servings (2 cups) but label gives you information for 1 serving (1 cup). Therefore, if you drink the whole bottle at your lunch, you must double the calories, fat, sugar, and other ingredients on the label. If you’ve eaten a smaller portion, then calculate accordingly.

Pay special attention to the amount of Sugars (listed under carbohydrates section of label) in one serving. This is especially important if you have diabetes (or other health concerns) that require you to monitor sugar intake or the glycemic index of foods. My rule of thumb is, if the amount of sugar higher than protein (listed write below the sugars), I try to skip it.

Check out the amount of fat, especially Trans fats in one serving. Those are especially known to contribute to “bad cholesterol,” which contributes to heart disease. Choose foods that have “Zero” Trans fats.

Be aware that “0” does not mean zero! It means less than 5% per serving!

Always look at the list of ingredients. It describes what is actually this product is made of and what else was added to it. If you cannot pronounce the words that are listed on a food label, it’s likely coming from chemicals and processed (unnatural) elements that are not healthy for the body. Some of the items you want to avoid include:

Preservatives including BHA, BHT, brominated products

GMO – genetically modified organisms, common in corn and soy derivatives

Dextrose

Xanthan gum

Hydrocarbons (pesticides PCB, DDE, DDT)

Soy, cottonseed oil, hydrogenated oils

Dyes (e.g., yellow dye no. 5, tartrazine, anything with numbers in it)

MSG – monosodium glutamate (common in canned foods and Asian cooking)

Food allergens – if you or family members have a known allergy to peanuts, wheat, soy, or gluten

If you are in a hurry and can’t take the time to read labels, be sure to avoid packaged (bag, box, or bottle) foods. Instead, buy fresh or frozen whole foods and “eat a rainbow everyday” (e.g., fruits, veggies, nuts, seeds, cheese, yogurt). Also, choose beverages with no sugar added (check that spot on the label).

If in doubt, do not eat it and always feel free to call us for an additional information. In our practice we always start with food, because “we are what we eat”. Eat Healthy – Stay Healthy!

References

  • David Katz, M.D. “Nutrition Detectives: Teaching Kids to Make Healthy Choices.” http://www.davidkatzmd.com/nutritiondetectives.aspx
  • Pizzorno, J.E. Textbook of Natural Medicine. Fourth edition. St Louis, Missouri: Elsevier Publishing: 2014.
  • United States Department of Agriculture. “Nutrition Facts Label.” Updated August 2006. http://www.choosemyplate.gov/sites/default/files/printablematerials/NutritionFactsLabel.pdf
  • United States Food and Drug Administration. “How to Understand and Use the Nutrition Facts Label.” Updated November 2004. http://www.fda.gov/Food/IngredientsPackagingLabeling/LabelingNutrition/ucm274593.htm

 

What Do You Really Know About Your Dietary Supplements?

What Do You Really Know About Your Dietary Supplements?

There’s a frightening and emerging trend plaguing the dietary supplement (DS) industry. Recent studies (conducted by independent labs, scientists, and/or newspapers) in which DS were randomly and independently tested have shown that DS products do not always contain the ingredients (or the purity of ingredients) stated on the product label. This concern goes across all supplements: vitamins, minerals, herbs/botanicals, and amino acids.

To complicate matters, manufacturers of DS are not required to submit products to the scientific scrutiny of the FDA because DS are regulated as a food product, not a drug. The Federal Trade Commission regulates advertising of product claims to prevent false claims, but that has nothing to do with the purity and quality of the pill you may be buying in the store. The FDA has the authority to spot-check supplements (and to remove products that violate certain regulations) but is not required by law to test, or require testing, on all over-the-counter supplements.

Several private groups, as well as the Government Accountability Office (Natural Resources and the Environment Division) want to have more done to hold supplement makers accountable for the purity of their products. It’s a heated debate, but as more clinicians, consumers, and retailers call for standardized practices for testing, producing, and marketing DS before they go on the market, the more confident we all can be about what we’re buying.

Be an informed consumer:

Read labels and understand what the terms on the label actually mean. Ingredients you don’t want to see include fillers, dyes, lead, dextrose.

Look for a Quality Assurance seal of approval: Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) and the U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP). Even better if products was third-party tested.

Purchase products from your healthcare provider or a reputable company that distributes its product only thorough trained healthcare practitioners.

Research the product / company on the Internet: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM). Look for product recalls and scams: FDA Health Fraud Scams & Tainted Supplements.

If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is not true.

Check products (and product recalls) on these websites: Council for Responsible NutritionConsumerLabs, and the National Institutes of Health Dietary Supplement QA Program.

Working for the last 10 years with various nutraceutical companies I have my list of “preferred” and “avoid”. I am gladly sharing this information with my patients and provide them with the best products on the market based on my expertise and experience. It is also imperative to use good product when one is looking for consistency in therapeutic results.

Feel free to call our office 212 -696-HEAL(4325) if you want supplements advise and consultation.

References:

  • ConsumerLab Independent Testing of Supplements https://www.consumerlab.com/aboutcl.asp
  • Council for Responsible Nutrition. “One Dozen Tips for Consumers.” http://www.crnusa.org/CRNfactsheetconsumertips.html
  • Harel, Z., et al. “The Frequency and Characteristics of Dietary Supplement Recalls in the United States.” JAMA Internal Medicine 173, no. 10 (2013): 929-930. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.379.
  • National Institutes of Health Quality Assurance Program https://ods.od.nih.gov/Research/AMRMQualityAssuranceProgram.aspx
  • U.S. Government Accountability Office. “Dietary Supplements: FDA Should Take Further Actions to Improve Oversight and Consumer Understanding.” Published January 29, 2009. http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-09-250
  • U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention. “USP & Dietary Supplement Manufacturers.” http://www.usp.org/usp-manufacturers/dietary-supplements
What is in your Herbal Supplements?

What is in your Herbal Supplements?

Herbal supplements (botanicals; plant-based medicine) have been used for medicinal purposes for thousands of years. Today they are widely recognized for having drug-like effects such as improving mood or controlling sugar level and blood pressure. However, being “natural” and having medicinal effects also carry risk, especially if taken with other medicines or supplements. Most over-the-counter herbal supplements are not subjected to the same scientific scrutiny and aren’t as strictly regulated as medications.

The makes of herbal supplements are not required to submit their products for FDA approval before going to market. Their only requirement is to demonstrate their products meet quality manufacturing standards. Studies have shown this is not enough: Many over-the-counter herbals are contaminated or substituted with alternative plant species and fillers that are not listed on the label. According to the World Health Organization, this adulteration of herbal products is a threat to consumer safety.

Before buying herbal supplements, do your homework and investigate potential benefits and side effects. Follow our tips below to help identify quality herbal supplements. Before taking an herbal supplement, talk your health practitioner–especially if you take other medications, have chronic health problems, or are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Quality Factors: Look for products that indicate standardized extracts; no fillers, preservatives/additives; naturally harvested; fair-trade/sustainable manufacturing practices.

Quality Control: Quality control (QC) refers to processes for maintaining the purity of a product. Without QC, there is no assurance that the herb contained in the bottle is the same as what is stated on the outside. One of the key solutions to the QC problem that exists in the United States is for manufacturers and suppliers to adhere to standardized manufacturing practices.

Products should indicate they are third-party tested. Look for a USP (U.S. Pharmacopeia) seal of approval. Check products (and product recalls) on these websites: Council for Responsible NutritionConsumerLabs, and the National Institutes of Health Dietary Supplement QA Program. Check the product website for more information.

If you need an advice on a professional quality botanical/herbal product, don’t hesitate to contact our office for recommendations 212 696- HEAL(4325). We prescreen and study the quality product for you and we use only physician grade, high quality herbal product from reputable manufacturers that make their priority to provide pharmaceutical quality herbs. Unfortunately, those are hardly ever available on-line or over the counter.

References:

Cleveland Clinic. “Herbal Supplements: Helpful or Harmful?” Reviewed December 2013. http://my.clevelandclinic.org/services/heart/prevention/emotional-health/holistic-therapies/herbal-supplements

Mayo Clinic. “Herbal Supplements: What to Know Before You Buy.” http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/herbal-supplements/art-20046714

Newmaster, S., et al. “DNA Barcoding Detects Contamination and Substitution in North American Herbal Products.” BMC Medicine 11 (2013): 222. http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/222

Pizzorno, J.E. Textbook of Natural Medicine. Fourth edition. St Louis, Missouri: Elsevier Publishing: 2014.

U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention. “USP & Dietary Supplement Manufacturers.” http://www.usp.org/usp-manufacturers/dietary-supplements

Zinc and Your Health

Zinc and Your Health

Next to iron, zinc is the most common mineral in the body and is found in every cell. It has an important role in the workings of the muscular system, reproductive systems in both men and women, and proper insulin and thyroid function. Zinc is a catalyst for the vitality of the skin and wound healing. However, zinc is probably best known for supporting the healthy functioning of the immune system.

Several studies have shown that zinc lozenges or syrup reduced the length of a cold by one day, especially when taken within 24 hours of the first signs and symptoms. Studies also show that taking zinc regularly might reduce the number of colds each year, the number of missed school days, and the amount of antibiotics required in otherwise healthy children. New studies are also looking at how the body uses zinc and whether or not taking zinc can improve the treatment of celiac disease, diabetes, and inflammatory bowel disease.

There are several forms of zinc, but not all are easily absorbed or appropriate for every person. The two best forms are zinc gluconate, and zinc citrate. According to the National Academy of Health Sciences, the need for a zinc supplement varies based on age, gender, pregnancy status, and other health factors. Zinc can interfere with the actions of some medications and can even affect the utilization of other minerals, such as copper. It’s best to first consult with your wellness practitioner before taking zinc. Men always require more zinc than women, mostly because zinc participates in production of testosterone and sperm.

Some of the symptoms of zinc deficiency could be frequent colds, decrease testosterone level or low mobility of sperm. One of the most peculiar symptoms is lack of smell and taste. In my office I offer a “taste test for zinc deficiency”. It involves taking a sip of concentrated zinc water and holding it in the mouth for 10-15 seconds. If it tastes like water to you, then you are deficient. If you identify somewhat tart taste, you probably barely making it. The reaction of person with sufficient amount of zinc in the body would be detecting a clear metal taste. Trust me, only few of people passed this test, majority of are deficient in zinc for many reasons. One of them, is that zinc, like no other element, participate in toxic metal detoxification. As you know, we all have exposure and demands on zinc are high.

In my practice I always try to use “food as medicine”. Here are the foods that are high in zinc and if you eat them regularly, you need for supplementation could be reduced. The top 5 are: oysters, beef and lamb meat, wheat germ, spinach and pumpkin seeds.

Eat away and be healthy! Don’t hesitate to our practice if you need advice or looking for guidance to address chronic medical conditions or optimize your health.

Toxins in Cosmetics

Toxins in Cosmetics

Did you know that on average, American women uses 12 personal care products a day and men average 6 products daily? Overall, an adult is likely to be exposed to 126 unique chemical ingredients in personal care products alone every single day. That means that throughout a year (365 days) we are exposed to almost 46,000 unique chemical ingredients just from personal care!

That is outrages statistics, considering that we can add to it other chemicals from food, air, water and medications.

Skin is one of the most important organs and average adult carries 8 pounds of it or 22 sq.foot. Skin is our first line of defense against foreign invaders and environmental factors. It is also permits substances like water and oxygen to pass through. You don’t have to be a biology professor to understand, how important to avoid “toxins” from impure cosmetic products.

Here is a list of ‘topical junk food’ that you will find in the many of the products you may have at home.

Parabens are used as preservative in cosmetics. This can actually have hormone-disrupting effects.

Silicones are used to make lotions ‘silky smooth’. These can block the skin’s ability to absorb, excrete, regulate, and breath. A popular silicon Dimethicone acts like a saran wrap over your face and suffocates your skin. I actually found Dimethicone in 5 of my products at home.

Sulfates are what makes our skin care products and cleansers foam and bubble so we really feel like we are getting a good cleanse.Actually, sulfates are not necessary make your skin cleaner, but they are carcinogenic.

DEA (diethanolamine) and TEA (Triethanolamine ) are also foaming agents, but both are carcinogenic and hormone disruptors.

Fragrances which are usually synthetic and added to almost everything nowadays disrupt hormones as well, so say good buy to smelling like a tangerine heaven, I’ll take my health over PCOS, infertility or diabetes.

Artificial colors which are also added to almost everything is another carcinogenic.A re you aware that MANY times companies artificially bleach their products to get that off-white, cream color that we have come so accustomed to seeing? They believe that this is what consumers want, so they add carcinogens into our product to achieve it.

And lastly our products typically contain Diazolidinyl, a preservative that is closely related to formaldehyde (kind of creepy, huh?). Again, this is another carcinogen.

Triclosan – one of the phthalates – is present in many antibacterial soaps and gels is strongly linked to behavioral disorders in children and is also carcinogenic.

Cosmetics are the least regulated products under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA). So, it become your own responsibility to protect yourself, your families and children from toxic exposure through cosmetics and personal care products.

In June of 2010 the European Union bans more than 1,400 chemicals from personal care products while the US only banned only 10 ingredients. http://environmentaldefence.ca/reports/toxic-nation-guide-cosmetics-laws-canada-vs-european-union

What ingredients does Europe ban that the US allows? http://ec.europa.eu/consumers/sectors/cosmetics/files/pdf/banned_cmr_en.pdf

I challenge you to go home and look at your products and see how many you find that contain ingredients currently BANNED in Europe.

Stop by our office today and get a free wallet size card with a list of chemicals to avoid in your cosmetic products.