Let's Talk About Skin Health

Let’s Talk About Skin Health

Are you taking care of your skin this summer? Biking, boating, picnics, and other summer activities may present challenges for exposed skin. It is very important to give the body the tools it needs to protect itself against damaging free radicals. A proper nutrition for healthy skin includes:

  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Other sources of antioxidants, such as green tea, nuts, and dark chocolate
  • Vitamins A, C, D, and E
  • Minerals such as zinc
  • Quality nutritional supplements

Standard Process supplements such as Cataplex F promotes healthy skin and hair*. Calcium Lactate supports maintenance and function of cell membranes*. While MediHerb supplement Gotu Kola Complex promotes healthy skin and connective tissue, provides antioxidant activity, and supports healthy capillaries.*

Summer skin needs care and attention inside and out. Support skin health with nutritional and herbal supplements.*

**These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

 

Elena Klimenko, MD, a certified functional medicine physician, will help you choose the right course of action to improve your nutrition. In her practice, she uses herbal and food based supplements to help patients address the root cause of their medical symptoms. Call today to find out more about functional medicine and speak with Dr. Klimenko at 212-696- HEAL(4325).
If you want more information about Functional Medicine, contact us to receive a FREE copy of  Dr Klimenko’s E-book.
Rose Hips for Wellness

Rose Hips for Wellness

There’s nothing like a rose to stimulate feelings of wellbeing. And nothing quite like rose hip – the actual fruit of a rose – to enhance health and promote wellness.

Of all the roses, the beautiful Wild Dog Rose is the type most often cultivated for their hips. Once the flower has bloomed, and all the petals have fallen off, the hip is picked and used in a range of herbal preparations. Rose hips contain a variety of antioxidants (especially Vitamin C), Vitamin A, carotenoids, and other plant compounds that are recognized for their role in preventing degenerative disease, including heart disease and certain types of cancer.

Many natural health practitioners use rose hip to treat wounds and inflammation. Rose hip oil is commonly used in cosmetics as it has the ability to revitalize skin cells. It has been used to treat scars, acne and burns. In Germany, rose hip powder (capsule) has been used to treat osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Herbalists have long used rose hip tea to ease constipation and as a supplement to treat a cold.

Rose hip pulp can be incorporated into sauces or made into a jelly. Standardized extracts are also available in capsules. Always check with your wellness practitioner before using any herbal remedy.

 

Elena Klimenko, MD, a certified functional medicine physician, will help you decide if Rose Hip is the right supplement for you. In her practice, she uses lifestyle modification and natural remedies to address the root cause of your medical symptoms. Call today to find out more about functional medicine and speak with Dr. Klimenko at 212-696- HEAL(4325).

 

 

References

  • Pyke, Magnus, and Ronald Melville. “Vitamin C in Rose Hips.” Biochemical Journal 36.3-4 (1942): 336-339. Accessed on March 28, 2016. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1265699/
  • Iherb.com “Rose Hip” Accessed on March 28, 2016. http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-rose-hip.html
  • Mahboubi, M. “Rosa Damascena as Holy Ancient Herb with Novel Applications.” Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine 6.1 (2016): 10-16. PMC. Web. 28 Mar. 2016. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4737971/
  • Phetcharat, L., Wongsuphasawat, K. & Winther, K. “The Effectiveness of a Standardized Rose Hip Powder, “Containing Seeds and Shells of Rosa Canina, on Cell Longevity, Skin Wrinkles, Moisture, and Elasticity.” Clinical Interventions in Aging 10 (2015), 1849-1856. PMC. Web. 28 Mar. 2016. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4655903/
  • Schwager, J.,et al. “A Novel Rose Hip Preparation with Enhanced Anti-Inflammatory and Chondroprotective Effects.” Mediators of Inflammation (2014) October. PMC. doi: 10.1155/2014/105710 Web. 28 Mar. 2016 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4211164/
  • S.N. Willich, K. Rossnagel, et al., “Rose hip herbal remedy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis – a randomised controlled trial.” Phytomedicine (2010) 17:2, 87-93. doi: 10.1016/j.phymed.2009.09.003 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0944711309002311
The Importance of Beta-Carotene

The Importance of Beta-Carotene

Beta-carotene has two important functions in the body: It functions as an antioxidant, protecting cells against damage, and it can be converted to Vitamin A (retinol), critical to maintaining skin and eye health.

Without beta-carotene, our bodies are unable to manufacture Vitamin A. And without sufficient Vitamin A, nearly all of our systems are at risk, including lungs, kidneys and immune function. Research shows that people who consume the necessary levels of beta-carotene are able to lower their risk for coronary artery disease, stroke, macular degeneration, and other age-related diseases.

You can get beta-carotene from a variety of foods:

  • Apricots
  • Asparagus
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Chinese cabbage
  • Yam/Sweet Potato
  • Spinach
  • Kale

The National Institutes of Health recommends a daily intake of 3,000 IU for adult men and 2,310 IU for adult women. For children, amounts vary according to age. While beta-carotene deficiency is rare in most industrialized countries, it can be difficult getting the recommended levels simply from food. That’s where supplements come in. In consult with your healthcare practitioner, design a plan that meets your individual needs. You may want to consider a supplement with a mixture of carotenoids, including beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lycopene, astaxanthin, lutein and zeaxanthin.

It’s possible to take too much beta-carotene. This is usually indicated by a yellowing of the skin, palms or soles and is known as carotenemia. Once consumption of beta carotene is reduced, this yellowing fades over time. As always, your best outcomes are achieved when working closely with your healthcare practitioner.

 

Elena Klimenko, MD, a certified functional medicine physician, will help you decide if Beta-Carotene is the right supplement for you. In her practice, she uses lifestyle modification and natural remedies to address the root cause of your medical symptoms. Call today to find out more about functional medicine and speak with Dr. Klimenko at 212-696- HEAL(4325).

 

References

  • MedicalNewsToday.com “What is Beta Carotene?” Accessed on March 30, 2016. http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/252758.php
  • National Institutes of Health. Vitamin A. Medical handout for health professionals. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminA-HealthProfessional/
  • MedlinePlus.com. “Beta Carotene”. Accessed on March 30, 2016. https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/999.html
  • Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Beta-carotene and other carotenoids. Dietary reference intakes for vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium, and carotenoids. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press; 2000:325-400. Accessed on March 30, 2016 http://www.nap.edu/read/9810/chapter/1
  • Bendich, A. “Functions and Actions of Retinoids and Carotenoids: Building on the Vision of James Allen Olson.” Jnl of Nutrition. (2004) American Society for Nutritional Sciences. Accessed on March 30, 2016. http://jn.nutrition.org/content/134/1/225S.full.pdf
  • van Poppel G, Spanhaak S, Ockhuizen T. Effect of beta-carotene on immunological indexes in healthy male smokers. Am J Clin Nutr. 1993; 57(3):402-407. Accessed on March 30, 2016 http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/57/3/402?related-urls=yes&legid=ajcn;57/3/402
Zinc and Your Health

Zinc and Your Health

Next to iron, zinc is the most common mineral in the body and is found in every cell. It has an important role in the workings of the muscular system, reproductive systems in both men and women, and proper insulin and thyroid function. Zinc is a catalyst for the vitality of the skin and wound healing. However, zinc is probably best known for supporting the healthy functioning of the immune system.

Several studies have shown that zinc lozenges or syrup reduced the length of a cold by one day, especially when taken within 24 hours of the first signs and symptoms. Studies also show that taking zinc regularly might reduce the number of colds each year, the number of missed school days, and the amount of antibiotics required in otherwise healthy children. New studies are also looking at how the body uses zinc and whether or not taking zinc can improve the treatment of celiac disease, diabetes, and inflammatory bowel disease.

There are several forms of zinc, but not all are easily absorbed or appropriate for every person. The two best forms are zinc gluconate, and zinc citrate. According to the National Academy of Health Sciences, the need for a zinc supplement varies based on age, gender, pregnancy status, and other health factors. Zinc can interfere with the actions of some medications and can even affect the utilization of other minerals, such as copper. It’s best to first consult with your wellness practitioner before taking zinc. Men always require more zinc than women, mostly because zinc participates in production of testosterone and sperm.

Some of the symptoms of zinc deficiency could be frequent colds, decrease testosterone level or low mobility of sperm. One of the most peculiar symptoms is lack of smell and taste. In my office I offer a “taste test for zinc deficiency”. It involves taking a sip of concentrated zinc water and holding it in the mouth for 10-15 seconds. If it tastes like water to you, then you are deficient. If you identify somewhat tart taste, you probably barely making it. The reaction of person with sufficient amount of zinc in the body would be detecting a clear metal taste. Trust me, only few of people passed this test, majority of are deficient in zinc for many reasons. One of them, is that zinc, like no other element, participate in toxic metal detoxification. As you know, we all have exposure and demands on zinc are high.

In my practice I always try to use “food as medicine”. Here are the foods that are high in zinc and if you eat them regularly, you need for supplementation could be reduced. The top 5 are: oysters, beef and lamb meat, wheat germ, spinach and pumpkin seeds.

Eat away and be healthy! Don’t hesitate to our practice if you need advice or looking for guidance to address chronic medical conditions or optimize your health.

Toxins in Cosmetics

Toxins in Cosmetics

Did you know that on average, American women uses 12 personal care products a day and men average 6 products daily? Overall, an adult is likely to be exposed to 126 unique chemical ingredients in personal care products alone every single day. That means that throughout a year (365 days) we are exposed to almost 46,000 unique chemical ingredients just from personal care!

That is outrages statistics, considering that we can add to it other chemicals from food, air, water and medications.

Skin is one of the most important organs and average adult carries 8 pounds of it or 22 sq.foot. Skin is our first line of defense against foreign invaders and environmental factors. It is also permits substances like water and oxygen to pass through. You don’t have to be a biology professor to understand, how important to avoid “toxins” from impure cosmetic products.

Here is a list of ‘topical junk food’ that you will find in the many of the products you may have at home.

Parabens are used as preservative in cosmetics. This can actually have hormone-disrupting effects.

Silicones are used to make lotions ‘silky smooth’. These can block the skin’s ability to absorb, excrete, regulate, and breath. A popular silicon Dimethicone acts like a saran wrap over your face and suffocates your skin. I actually found Dimethicone in 5 of my products at home.

Sulfates are what makes our skin care products and cleansers foam and bubble so we really feel like we are getting a good cleanse.Actually, sulfates are not necessary make your skin cleaner, but they are carcinogenic.

DEA (diethanolamine) and TEA (Triethanolamine ) are also foaming agents, but both are carcinogenic and hormone disruptors.

Fragrances which are usually synthetic and added to almost everything nowadays disrupt hormones as well, so say good buy to smelling like a tangerine heaven, I’ll take my health over PCOS, infertility or diabetes.

Artificial colors which are also added to almost everything is another carcinogenic.A re you aware that MANY times companies artificially bleach their products to get that off-white, cream color that we have come so accustomed to seeing? They believe that this is what consumers want, so they add carcinogens into our product to achieve it.

And lastly our products typically contain Diazolidinyl, a preservative that is closely related to formaldehyde (kind of creepy, huh?). Again, this is another carcinogen.

Triclosan – one of the phthalates – is present in many antibacterial soaps and gels is strongly linked to behavioral disorders in children and is also carcinogenic.

Cosmetics are the least regulated products under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA). So, it become your own responsibility to protect yourself, your families and children from toxic exposure through cosmetics and personal care products.

In June of 2010 the European Union bans more than 1,400 chemicals from personal care products while the US only banned only 10 ingredients. http://environmentaldefence.ca/reports/toxic-nation-guide-cosmetics-laws-canada-vs-european-union

What ingredients does Europe ban that the US allows? http://ec.europa.eu/consumers/sectors/cosmetics/files/pdf/banned_cmr_en.pdf

I challenge you to go home and look at your products and see how many you find that contain ingredients currently BANNED in Europe.

Stop by our office today and get a free wallet size card with a list of chemicals to avoid in your cosmetic products.

Chronic Yeast Infection – Chronic Candidiasis

I recently had seen a patient, Katelyn, who is 29 years old lady and came asking for help. She is been seeing multiple physicians for the past 2 years who treated her for repetitive infections, mostly sinus and vaginal. The common denominator of those treatments was one factor – multiple antibiotics. Her current complaint was debilitating fatigue. She reported feeling like an old woman and falling asleep at any moment she sat down. That is in spite of good 8-9 hours of sleep every night, though she does not wake up refreshed.

She also complaints of foggy brain and short term memory loss, extreme craving for sweet foods and inability to lose weight,some joint pain and infertility in the past few years, though she had no problems to conceive twice in the past 5-7 years.She was trying to exercise but it did not help her to lose any weight. Her medical history and symptoms made me think of possible diagnosis of Candidiasis.

Candidiasis is a common yeast infection that can affect the skin, mouth, and the gastrointestinal tract. This yeast normally dwells in the digestive tract, but malnutrition, environmental toxins, and the excessive use of antibiotics, can allow the yeast to multiply uncontrollably. In many cases this infection presents itself in the mucous of mouth and genitalia, skin, and internal organs, but it can also affect your weight and metabolism. Yeast overgrowth creates an allergic response and triggers a hormonal imbalance. This can slow down the calorie burning process, inhibiting your body from burning fat, increase sweets craving. Watch the video to better understand the causes and mechanisms behind this debilitating condition.

If your story sounds like Katelyn’s you might be suffering from chronic yeast infection of Candidiasis. Feel free to call our office to schedule a functional medicine consultation.

While systemic yeast is commonly associated with obesity and skin infection, it can be treated naturally by stabilizing the growth of yeast in your body. With functional medicine approach which includes dietary modifications, homeopathic and natural supplements, we can help you to safely and effectively treat the obesity and restore a natural balance to your digestive system. Take the “Yeast Overgrowth” questionnaire by contacting our office at www.DrElenaKlimenko.com or calling 212-696-HEAL(4325).