Let's Talk About Skin Health

Let’s Talk About Skin Health

Are you taking care of your skin this summer? Biking, boating, picnics, and other summer activities may present challenges for exposed skin. It is very important to give the body the tools it needs to protect itself against damaging free radicals. A proper nutrition for healthy skin includes:

  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Other sources of antioxidants, such as green tea, nuts, and dark chocolate
  • Vitamins A, C, D, and E
  • Minerals such as zinc
  • Quality nutritional supplements

Standard Process supplements such as Cataplex F promotes healthy skin and hair*. Calcium Lactate supports maintenance and function of cell membranes*. While MediHerb supplement Gotu Kola Complex promotes healthy skin and connective tissue, provides antioxidant activity, and supports healthy capillaries.*

Summer skin needs care and attention inside and out. Support skin health with nutritional and herbal supplements.*

**These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

 

Elena Klimenko, MD, a certified functional medicine physician, will help you choose the right course of action to improve your nutrition. In her practice, she uses herbal and food based supplements to help patients address the root cause of their medical symptoms. Call today to find out more about functional medicine and speak with Dr. Klimenko at 212-696- HEAL(4325).
If you want more information about Functional Medicine, contact us to receive a FREE copy of  Dr Klimenko’s E-book.
Rose Hips for Wellness

Rose Hips for Wellness

There’s nothing like a rose to stimulate feelings of wellbeing. And nothing quite like rose hip – the actual fruit of a rose – to enhance health and promote wellness.

Of all the roses, the beautiful Wild Dog Rose is the type most often cultivated for their hips. Once the flower has bloomed, and all the petals have fallen off, the hip is picked and used in a range of herbal preparations. Rose hips contain a variety of antioxidants (especially Vitamin C), Vitamin A, carotenoids, and other plant compounds that are recognized for their role in preventing degenerative disease, including heart disease and certain types of cancer.

Many natural health practitioners use rose hip to treat wounds and inflammation. Rose hip oil is commonly used in cosmetics as it has the ability to revitalize skin cells. It has been used to treat scars, acne and burns. In Germany, rose hip powder (capsule) has been used to treat osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Herbalists have long used rose hip tea to ease constipation and as a supplement to treat a cold.

Rose hip pulp can be incorporated into sauces or made into a jelly. Standardized extracts are also available in capsules. Always check with your wellness practitioner before using any herbal remedy.

 

Elena Klimenko, MD, a certified functional medicine physician, will help you decide if Rose Hip is the right supplement for you. In her practice, she uses lifestyle modification and natural remedies to address the root cause of your medical symptoms. Call today to find out more about functional medicine and speak with Dr. Klimenko at 212-696- HEAL(4325).

 

 

References

  • Pyke, Magnus, and Ronald Melville. “Vitamin C in Rose Hips.” Biochemical Journal 36.3-4 (1942): 336-339. Accessed on March 28, 2016. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1265699/
  • Iherb.com “Rose Hip” Accessed on March 28, 2016. http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-rose-hip.html
  • Mahboubi, M. “Rosa Damascena as Holy Ancient Herb with Novel Applications.” Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine 6.1 (2016): 10-16. PMC. Web. 28 Mar. 2016. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4737971/
  • Phetcharat, L., Wongsuphasawat, K. & Winther, K. “The Effectiveness of a Standardized Rose Hip Powder, “Containing Seeds and Shells of Rosa Canina, on Cell Longevity, Skin Wrinkles, Moisture, and Elasticity.” Clinical Interventions in Aging 10 (2015), 1849-1856. PMC. Web. 28 Mar. 2016. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4655903/
  • Schwager, J.,et al. “A Novel Rose Hip Preparation with Enhanced Anti-Inflammatory and Chondroprotective Effects.” Mediators of Inflammation (2014) October. PMC. doi: 10.1155/2014/105710 Web. 28 Mar. 2016 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4211164/
  • S.N. Willich, K. Rossnagel, et al., “Rose hip herbal remedy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis – a randomised controlled trial.” Phytomedicine (2010) 17:2, 87-93. doi: 10.1016/j.phymed.2009.09.003 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0944711309002311
The Fig: Sweet. Succulent. Sensual.

The Fig: Sweet. Succulent. Sensual.

One of the “Seven Spices of Israel” and referenced in many religious texts as a sacred fruit, the fig (Angeer), is rich in nutrition and history. For centuries, figs have been referenced in mythology and traditional medicine as a powerful sexual supplement. While they have yet to be adequately studied as an aphrodisiac in humans, some animal studies show figs can increase sperm count and motility. The health benefits of figs are far ranging. They are a great source of dietary fiber, vitamin B6, copper, potassium, calcium, manganese, and the antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E.

The fig offers a unique combination of textures – chewy flesh, smooth skin, and crunchy seeds. California figs are typically harvested June through September. European varieties are available into the fall months. The majority of figs are dried fruits that can be enjoyed anytime of the year.

When selecting dried figs, they should be plump and soft. They will keep for long periods in a cool, dry place. When choosing fresh figs, which are beautifully delicate, select those with deep color, little bruising and sweet fragrance. Keep them in the fridge and plan to eat them in one or two days; don’t wash until ready to eat. If figs are not yet ripe, keep them at room temperature to ripen.

Figs can add a sweet sensation to just about any dish. But the high fiber can produce a laxative effect, so don’t over do it.

Roasted Fig and Goat Cheese

You and your partner will swoon over the delectable combination of sweet, ripe fig filled with creamy goat cheese and drizzled with tangy balsamic and honey. All natural and gluten free, perfect for a romantic appetizer or healthy snacking after a little love in the afternoon!

Ingredients

  • 12 Black Mission figs, halved vertically
  • 1 Tbs unsalted butter
  • 3 Tbs balsamic vinegar
  • 3 Tbs honey
  • 2-3 ounces fresh goat cheese
  • Flaky sea salt, to taste

Preparation:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. While the oven preheats, melt the butter in a small saucepan, along with the balsamic vinegar, honey, and a hefty pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook about 5 minutes, or until slightly thickened.
  3. Place the figs, cut side up, in a baking dish the size of a pie pan. Top each fig half with a 1/2 tsp to 1 tsp of goat cheese. Drizzle the balsamic vinegar syrup over the figs.
  4. Roast in the oven until very soft, 10 to 15 minutes.
  5. Arrange on a platter and sprinkle with flaky salt.

 

Call our office 212-696-HEAL if you want to receive a medical consultation and guidance how to improve your health. Here, at Healthy Wealthy & Wise Medical, P.C. we evaluate our patients through holistic and functional medicine understanding of health and balance of vital organs and system and prescribe a comprehensive treatment plan.

 

References

  • Patil, V. & Patil, V.R., “Ficas carica: An Overview.” Research Jl. of Medicinal Plants. (2011) 5:3, 246-253. Accessed on 10 June 2016: http://docsdrive.com/pdfs/academicjournals/rjmp/2011/246-253.pdf
  • California Rare Fruit Growers. Accessed on 10 June 2016: https://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/fig.html
  • The World’s Healthiest Foods. Accessed on 10 June 2016: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=24#nutritionalprofile
  • Organic Facts. “Health Benefits of Fig.” Accessed on 10 June 2016: https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/fruit/health-benefits-of-figs-or-anjeer.html *Has a terrific chart How to Stay Healthy on Figs that is downloadable.
  • Naghdi M., Maghbool M., et al. “Effects of Common Fig (Ficus carica) Leaf Extracts on Sperm Parameters and Testis of Mice Intoxicated with Formaldehyde.” Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, (2016) doi:10.1155/2016/2539127. Accessed 10 June 2016: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4745414/
  • http://www.popsugar.com/food/Easy-Roasted-Fig-Goat-Cheese-Recipe-9205886
The Importance of Beta-Carotene

The Importance of Beta-Carotene

Beta-carotene has two important functions in the body: It functions as an antioxidant, protecting cells against damage, and it can be converted to Vitamin A (retinol), critical to maintaining skin and eye health.

Without beta-carotene, our bodies are unable to manufacture Vitamin A. And without sufficient Vitamin A, nearly all of our systems are at risk, including lungs, kidneys and immune function. Research shows that people who consume the necessary levels of beta-carotene are able to lower their risk for coronary artery disease, stroke, macular degeneration, and other age-related diseases.

You can get beta-carotene from a variety of foods:

  • Apricots
  • Asparagus
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Chinese cabbage
  • Yam/Sweet Potato
  • Spinach
  • Kale

The National Institutes of Health recommends a daily intake of 3,000 IU for adult men and 2,310 IU for adult women. For children, amounts vary according to age. While beta-carotene deficiency is rare in most industrialized countries, it can be difficult getting the recommended levels simply from food. That’s where supplements come in. In consult with your healthcare practitioner, design a plan that meets your individual needs. You may want to consider a supplement with a mixture of carotenoids, including beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lycopene, astaxanthin, lutein and zeaxanthin.

It’s possible to take too much beta-carotene. This is usually indicated by a yellowing of the skin, palms or soles and is known as carotenemia. Once consumption of beta carotene is reduced, this yellowing fades over time. As always, your best outcomes are achieved when working closely with your healthcare practitioner.

 

Elena Klimenko, MD, a certified functional medicine physician, will help you decide if Beta-Carotene is the right supplement for you. In her practice, she uses lifestyle modification and natural remedies to address the root cause of your medical symptoms. Call today to find out more about functional medicine and speak with Dr. Klimenko at 212-696- HEAL(4325).

 

References

  • MedicalNewsToday.com “What is Beta Carotene?” Accessed on March 30, 2016. http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/252758.php
  • National Institutes of Health. Vitamin A. Medical handout for health professionals. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminA-HealthProfessional/
  • MedlinePlus.com. “Beta Carotene”. Accessed on March 30, 2016. https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/999.html
  • Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Beta-carotene and other carotenoids. Dietary reference intakes for vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium, and carotenoids. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press; 2000:325-400. Accessed on March 30, 2016 http://www.nap.edu/read/9810/chapter/1
  • Bendich, A. “Functions and Actions of Retinoids and Carotenoids: Building on the Vision of James Allen Olson.” Jnl of Nutrition. (2004) American Society for Nutritional Sciences. Accessed on March 30, 2016. http://jn.nutrition.org/content/134/1/225S.full.pdf
  • van Poppel G, Spanhaak S, Ockhuizen T. Effect of beta-carotene on immunological indexes in healthy male smokers. Am J Clin Nutr. 1993; 57(3):402-407. Accessed on March 30, 2016 http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/57/3/402?related-urls=yes&legid=ajcn;57/3/402
Go Wild with Dandelion Greens

Go Wild with Dandelion Greens

You might not want dandelions (Taraxacum officinale) grow across your lawn, but you definitely want to make them a part your healthy diet. For centuries, the sunny yellow dandelion, its greens and roots, has been embraced across cultures for its culinary and medicinal uses.

Dandelion roots contain several compounds beneficial to health, one of which is bitter taraxacin, which stimulates digestion. The leaves are rich in potassium, antioxidants such as Vitamin A and Vitamin C, Vitamin K, and several B vitamins.

Dandelion helps filter waste products from the blood by the liver. In many cultures it has been used as a liver tonic, diuretic, and digestive aid. Herbalists have used dandelion to treat jaundice, cirrhosis and liver dysfunction. Some research suggests dandelion may even strengthen liver and gallbladder function.

All parts of the dandelion are edible. The bittersweet roots may be eaten raw, steamed or dried, roasted and ground for a coffee substitute. The flowers are commonly used to make wine and jam. Dandelion greens can be eaten steamed, boiled, sautéed, braised or raw in salads.

Try adding dandelion greens to:

  • quiche, omelette
  • pesto
  • sauce such as garlic & olive oil
  • dips
  • seafood soup
  • sautéed vegetables
  • to replace some of the kale in a green smoothie
  • stuffing

Dandelion packs as much power in its flavor as it does in its nutrition. It can quickly overpower more delicate herbs and flavors; a little goes a long way.

When harvesting dandelion, especially for salad, take greens from young and tender plants, before the first flower emerges. Greens from older plants will be larger, but also tougher and bitterer. Older leaves are more suited for cooking. At the grocery store, look for organic dandelion with vibrant green color.

Dandelion Salad Recipe with Fresh Goat Cheese & Apples

Dandelion greens pack a nutritional punch. Serve them raw in this salad recipe with fresh goat cheese and apples for added flavor. If you don’t have apples in season, or stored, substitute any firm fruit that’s in season. You can embellish this salad with the colors of the season by sprinkling in any of our ‘SuperSalad Substitutions’ listed below.

Ingredients

  • 2 T. cider vinegar
  • 3 T. vegetable or nut oil
  • 1 t. Dijon mustard
  • 1 t. honey
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 bunch dandelion greens, washed and dried, stems removed
  • 1/4 lb fresh white goat cheese, crumbled
References
Go Wild with Dandelion Greens
  • Herb Wisdom.com. Benefits of Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale). Accessed on Jan. 4, 2016. http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-dandelion.html
  • University of Maryland Medical Center, Complementary and Alternative Medicine Database. “Dandelion”. Accessed on January 4, 2016. https://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/dandelion
  • Self-Nutrition Data.com. Raw Dandelion Greens- Nutrition Facts. http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2441/2
  • Whole Foods Market.com Dandelion Greens-No Common Weed! Accessed on January 4, 2016: http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/blog/whole-story/dandelion-greens-%E2%80%93-no-common-weed
  • González-Castejón, M., Visioli, F. & Rodriguez-Casado, A. “Diverse biological activities of Dandelion.” Nutrition Reviews. (Sept 01, 2012), 70,9: 534-547. Oxford University Press Journals. Accessed on Jan. 4, 2016. First published online: 1 September 2012.
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1753-4887.2012.00509.x
Dandelion Salad Recipe with Fresh Goat Cheese & Apples
  • Recipe Adapted from Mother Earth News. Roger Doiron (April/May 2008) http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/dandelion-salad-recipe-zmaz08amzmcc.aspx