Let's Talk About Skin Health

Let’s Talk About Skin Health

Are you taking care of your skin this summer? Biking, boating, picnics, and other summer activities may present challenges for exposed skin. It is very important to give the body the tools it needs to protect itself against damaging free radicals. A proper nutrition for healthy skin includes:

  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Other sources of antioxidants, such as green tea, nuts, and dark chocolate
  • Vitamins A, C, D, and E
  • Minerals such as zinc
  • Quality nutritional supplements

Standard Process supplements such as Cataplex F promotes healthy skin and hair*. Calcium Lactate supports maintenance and function of cell membranes*. While MediHerb supplement Gotu Kola Complex promotes healthy skin and connective tissue, provides antioxidant activity, and supports healthy capillaries.*

Summer skin needs care and attention inside and out. Support skin health with nutritional and herbal supplements.*

**These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

 

Elena Klimenko, MD, a certified functional medicine physician, will help you choose the right course of action to improve your nutrition. In her practice, she uses herbal and food based supplements to help patients address the root cause of their medical symptoms. Call today to find out more about functional medicine and speak with Dr. Klimenko at 212-696- HEAL(4325).
If you want more information about Functional Medicine, contact us to receive a FREE copy of  Dr Klimenko’s E-book.
Managing Seasonal Allergies

Managing Seasonal Allergies

Those who suffer from seasonal allergies, especially during the spring time, know that it is around the corner. There are three major allergy seasons for outside allergens, which are:

· Spring (starts February, tree pollen is the main culprit here)

· Summer (caused mostly by grasses which release allergy-causing pollen. The typical grasses include Timothy, Johnson and Rye) and

· Fall (weeds especially ragweed, which grows almost everywhere).

Causes

Our environment and abundance of the toxins, including pharmaceuticals are the mail cause of the immune system become overly stimulated and reacts easily to changes. Dr. Leo Galland and his book titled “The Allergy Solution” that the body’s immune system can be overly sensitized due to environmental toxins in the air, excess use of antibiotics and a fluctuating food system which causes internal inflammation and nutrient deficiencies.

Preparation for Allergy season

The most important and first step in preparation for allergy season is to know what you are really allergic to. This helps to reduce the burden of exposure if you avoid it. The second step is to identify the allergy remedy that works for you. It advised to start taking natural medicine for allergies at least a week before the exposure.

Treatment

Not every environmental allergy needs to be treated pharmaceutically. Actually, the drugs are very effective, but they don’t address the root cause of the allergy. There are a lot of natural substances that we use in our practice working really well, as well as homeopathic medicines. Here are my favorite.

  1. Improve nutritional status of the patient with basic food based supplement Catalyn by Standard Process. The rich content of this supplement provides wide variety of nutrients that body needs to perform well. This product is available in gluten-free version and in chewable version for kids (great support for kids who don’t like to eat veggies).
  1. Antronex by Standard Process is a unique formula with antihistaminic effect and improving liver circulation. This helps to detoxify blood from the “storm of antibodies” that are formed by immune system in response to exposure.
  1. Albizia Complex by MediHerb is a special combination of herbs: Albizia bark, Chinese Skullcap root and Feverfew leaf and stem. This is intended to maintain normal upper respiratory tract and skin function. promotes a normal response to occasional seasonal allergy, and supports a normal immune response.
  1. Allerplex complex by Standard Process is a powerful nutritional supplement used in the treatment of seasonal allergy. It helps to support the upper and lower respiration. It contains Vitamin A and Vitamin C which supports the ability of the body to handle seasonal, environmental, and dietary challenges. It supports healthy state of mucous membranes, liver, lung, and respiratory function.

There are certain food that help to combat seasonal allergy. Some which include:

· Vitamin C: this is a natural antihistamine which opposes the activity of histamine receptors in the body, thereby stopping the symptoms of allergy. This can be found in berries, lemons and other citrus fruits, broccoli, leafy greens and chilies.

· Vegetables that are rich in chlorophyll such as watercress, arugula, kale, swiss chard, spinach and mustard green, all help to clear allergies immune enhancing inflammatory properties and also because of the fact that they detoxify the liver, thereby helping the body process any immune triggers present in the body

· Quercetin: this is a flavonoid present in onions, apples, and cabbages, which help to prevent allergies

· Probiotics: they are live bacteria and yeast which are good for digestion of food in the human body. These bacteria are extremely good for the human health. They normalize the immune system and kill unhealthy bacteria in the gut.

In our functional/integrative medicine approach to treatment of allergy the patient is in the center of the care. The goal of functional medicine is to build therapeutic relationship between the patient and the doctor, which addresses the healing of the whole person, including the lifestyle.

If this approach resonate with your believes and you believe that prevention is the best treatment, functional and integrative medical care is for you. Call us we’ll be happy to help 212-696-4325 or email at [email protected]

Rose Hips for Wellness

Rose Hips for Wellness

There’s nothing like a rose to stimulate feelings of wellbeing. And nothing quite like rose hip – the actual fruit of a rose – to enhance health and promote wellness.

Of all the roses, the beautiful Wild Dog Rose is the type most often cultivated for their hips. Once the flower has bloomed, and all the petals have fallen off, the hip is picked and used in a range of herbal preparations. Rose hips contain a variety of antioxidants (especially Vitamin C), Vitamin A, carotenoids, and other plant compounds that are recognized for their role in preventing degenerative disease, including heart disease and certain types of cancer.

Many natural health practitioners use rose hip to treat wounds and inflammation. Rose hip oil is commonly used in cosmetics as it has the ability to revitalize skin cells. It has been used to treat scars, acne and burns. In Germany, rose hip powder (capsule) has been used to treat osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Herbalists have long used rose hip tea to ease constipation and as a supplement to treat a cold.

Rose hip pulp can be incorporated into sauces or made into a jelly. Standardized extracts are also available in capsules. Always check with your wellness practitioner before using any herbal remedy.

 

Elena Klimenko, MD, a certified functional medicine physician, will help you decide if Rose Hip is the right supplement for you. In her practice, she uses lifestyle modification and natural remedies to address the root cause of your medical symptoms. Call today to find out more about functional medicine and speak with Dr. Klimenko at 212-696- HEAL(4325).

 

 

References

  • Pyke, Magnus, and Ronald Melville. “Vitamin C in Rose Hips.” Biochemical Journal 36.3-4 (1942): 336-339. Accessed on March 28, 2016. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1265699/
  • Iherb.com “Rose Hip” Accessed on March 28, 2016. http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-rose-hip.html
  • Mahboubi, M. “Rosa Damascena as Holy Ancient Herb with Novel Applications.” Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine 6.1 (2016): 10-16. PMC. Web. 28 Mar. 2016. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4737971/
  • Phetcharat, L., Wongsuphasawat, K. & Winther, K. “The Effectiveness of a Standardized Rose Hip Powder, “Containing Seeds and Shells of Rosa Canina, on Cell Longevity, Skin Wrinkles, Moisture, and Elasticity.” Clinical Interventions in Aging 10 (2015), 1849-1856. PMC. Web. 28 Mar. 2016. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4655903/
  • Schwager, J.,et al. “A Novel Rose Hip Preparation with Enhanced Anti-Inflammatory and Chondroprotective Effects.” Mediators of Inflammation (2014) October. PMC. doi: 10.1155/2014/105710 Web. 28 Mar. 2016 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4211164/
  • S.N. Willich, K. Rossnagel, et al., “Rose hip herbal remedy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis – a randomised controlled trial.” Phytomedicine (2010) 17:2, 87-93. doi: 10.1016/j.phymed.2009.09.003 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0944711309002311
The Fig: Sweet. Succulent. Sensual.

The Fig: Sweet. Succulent. Sensual.

One of the “Seven Spices of Israel” and referenced in many religious texts as a sacred fruit, the fig (Angeer), is rich in nutrition and history. For centuries, figs have been referenced in mythology and traditional medicine as a powerful sexual supplement. While they have yet to be adequately studied as an aphrodisiac in humans, some animal studies show figs can increase sperm count and motility. The health benefits of figs are far ranging. They are a great source of dietary fiber, vitamin B6, copper, potassium, calcium, manganese, and the antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E.

The fig offers a unique combination of textures – chewy flesh, smooth skin, and crunchy seeds. California figs are typically harvested June through September. European varieties are available into the fall months. The majority of figs are dried fruits that can be enjoyed anytime of the year.

When selecting dried figs, they should be plump and soft. They will keep for long periods in a cool, dry place. When choosing fresh figs, which are beautifully delicate, select those with deep color, little bruising and sweet fragrance. Keep them in the fridge and plan to eat them in one or two days; don’t wash until ready to eat. If figs are not yet ripe, keep them at room temperature to ripen.

Figs can add a sweet sensation to just about any dish. But the high fiber can produce a laxative effect, so don’t over do it.

Roasted Fig and Goat Cheese

You and your partner will swoon over the delectable combination of sweet, ripe fig filled with creamy goat cheese and drizzled with tangy balsamic and honey. All natural and gluten free, perfect for a romantic appetizer or healthy snacking after a little love in the afternoon!

Ingredients

  • 12 Black Mission figs, halved vertically
  • 1 Tbs unsalted butter
  • 3 Tbs balsamic vinegar
  • 3 Tbs honey
  • 2-3 ounces fresh goat cheese
  • Flaky sea salt, to taste

Preparation:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. While the oven preheats, melt the butter in a small saucepan, along with the balsamic vinegar, honey, and a hefty pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook about 5 minutes, or until slightly thickened.
  3. Place the figs, cut side up, in a baking dish the size of a pie pan. Top each fig half with a 1/2 tsp to 1 tsp of goat cheese. Drizzle the balsamic vinegar syrup over the figs.
  4. Roast in the oven until very soft, 10 to 15 minutes.
  5. Arrange on a platter and sprinkle with flaky salt.

 

Call our office 212-696-HEAL if you want to receive a medical consultation and guidance how to improve your health. Here, at Healthy Wealthy & Wise Medical, P.C. we evaluate our patients through holistic and functional medicine understanding of health and balance of vital organs and system and prescribe a comprehensive treatment plan.

 

References

  • Patil, V. & Patil, V.R., “Ficas carica: An Overview.” Research Jl. of Medicinal Plants. (2011) 5:3, 246-253. Accessed on 10 June 2016: http://docsdrive.com/pdfs/academicjournals/rjmp/2011/246-253.pdf
  • California Rare Fruit Growers. Accessed on 10 June 2016: https://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/fig.html
  • The World’s Healthiest Foods. Accessed on 10 June 2016: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=24#nutritionalprofile
  • Organic Facts. “Health Benefits of Fig.” Accessed on 10 June 2016: https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/fruit/health-benefits-of-figs-or-anjeer.html *Has a terrific chart How to Stay Healthy on Figs that is downloadable.
  • Naghdi M., Maghbool M., et al. “Effects of Common Fig (Ficus carica) Leaf Extracts on Sperm Parameters and Testis of Mice Intoxicated with Formaldehyde.” Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, (2016) doi:10.1155/2016/2539127. Accessed 10 June 2016: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4745414/
  • http://www.popsugar.com/food/Easy-Roasted-Fig-Goat-Cheese-Recipe-9205886
Garlic: Good for Your Heart!

Garlic: Good for Your Heart!

It may not smell like a lily, but Garlic (Allium sativum) is an edible bulb from the lily family. Fondly known to herbalists as “the stinking rose”, for centuries, there has been many traditional medicine uses for Garlic, including treatment of skin conditions, immune support, antimicrobial and, to reduce risk for cancer and heart disease. In fact, Garlic is one of the most widely studied herbal supplements for its beneficial effects on the heart.

The benefits of garlic are far ranging. Garlic contains several vitamins and minerals that support heart health, including vitamin B6, vitamin C, manganese, and selenium. But it’s the chemicals that give garlic its pungent odor that scientists believe are the source of the herb’s heart health-promoting effects. Garlic is rich in the antioxidant compounds (allicin, alliin, and ajoene) that help reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease.

Studies on garlic and the cardiovascular system typically use garlic powder, oil, or aged extracts. To date, the effects of garlic on the heart that are supported by science include:

Slows the development of atherosclerosis (building the plaques that cause narrowing of the arteries)

Reduces blood pressure

Reduces triglycerides and therefore lowers total cholesterol

The amount of active compounds supplied by garlic supplements can vary because allicin is fragile to things such as air and heat. For example, aging garlic to reduce its odor also reduces the allicin present and compromises the effectiveness of the product. Adding to your diet 1-2 cloves of fresh garlic per day may be sufficient to protect your cardio-vascular system. Easiest way to do it is to blend it with your morning shake and rip full benefits of food based nutrients. To prevent garlic smell adds cilantro or parsley to the blend, which are also powerful antioxidant herbs.

Generally safe for most adults, taking a garlic supplement can cause heartburn, upset stomach, an allergic reaction, and breath and body odor (common with raw garlic). Garlic should not be taken by persons who are preparing for surgery or who have bleeding disorders because it can impair the body’s ability to form blood clots.

 

References

  • World’s Healthiest Foods: Garlic. http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=60
  • National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. Garlic. https://nccih.nih.gov/health/garlic/ataglance.htm
  • Medline Plus. Herbs and Supplements: Garlic. (Includes information on garlic interactions with other drugs) https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/300.html
  • Karagodin VP, Sobenin IA, Orekhov AN. Antiatherosclerotic and Cardioprotective Effects of Time-Released Garlic Powder Pills. Curr Pharm Des. 2015 Nov 12. Available from: http://www.eurekaselect.com/136921/article
  • Seki, T. and Hosono, T. Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases by Garlic-Derived Sulfur Compounds. Jnl of Nutritional Science & Vitaminology (Tokyo). 2015. 61 Suppl:S83-85. doi: 10.3177/jnsv.61.S83. Date Accessed: Dec 8, 2015. https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jnsv/61/Supplement/61_S83/_pdf
  • Xiong, XJ., Wang, PQ, et al., Garlic for hypertension: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Phytomedicine. 2015 Mar 15;22(3):352-61. doi: 10.1016/j.phymed.2014.12.013. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25837272

 

Go Wild with Dandelion Greens

Go Wild with Dandelion Greens

You might not want dandelions (Taraxacum officinale) grow across your lawn, but you definitely want to make them a part your healthy diet. For centuries, the sunny yellow dandelion, its greens and roots, has been embraced across cultures for its culinary and medicinal uses.

Dandelion roots contain several compounds beneficial to health, one of which is bitter taraxacin, which stimulates digestion. The leaves are rich in potassium, antioxidants such as Vitamin A and Vitamin C, Vitamin K, and several B vitamins.

Dandelion helps filter waste products from the blood by the liver. In many cultures it has been used as a liver tonic, diuretic, and digestive aid. Herbalists have used dandelion to treat jaundice, cirrhosis and liver dysfunction. Some research suggests dandelion may even strengthen liver and gallbladder function.

All parts of the dandelion are edible. The bittersweet roots may be eaten raw, steamed or dried, roasted and ground for a coffee substitute. The flowers are commonly used to make wine and jam. Dandelion greens can be eaten steamed, boiled, sautéed, braised or raw in salads.

Try adding dandelion greens to:

  • quiche, omelette
  • pesto
  • sauce such as garlic & olive oil
  • dips
  • seafood soup
  • sautéed vegetables
  • to replace some of the kale in a green smoothie
  • stuffing

Dandelion packs as much power in its flavor as it does in its nutrition. It can quickly overpower more delicate herbs and flavors; a little goes a long way.

When harvesting dandelion, especially for salad, take greens from young and tender plants, before the first flower emerges. Greens from older plants will be larger, but also tougher and bitterer. Older leaves are more suited for cooking. At the grocery store, look for organic dandelion with vibrant green color.

Dandelion Salad Recipe with Fresh Goat Cheese & Apples

Dandelion greens pack a nutritional punch. Serve them raw in this salad recipe with fresh goat cheese and apples for added flavor. If you don’t have apples in season, or stored, substitute any firm fruit that’s in season. You can embellish this salad with the colors of the season by sprinkling in any of our ‘SuperSalad Substitutions’ listed below.

Ingredients

  • 2 T. cider vinegar
  • 3 T. vegetable or nut oil
  • 1 t. Dijon mustard
  • 1 t. honey
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 bunch dandelion greens, washed and dried, stems removed
  • 1/4 lb fresh white goat cheese, crumbled
References
Go Wild with Dandelion Greens
  • Herb Wisdom.com. Benefits of Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale). Accessed on Jan. 4, 2016. http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-dandelion.html
  • University of Maryland Medical Center, Complementary and Alternative Medicine Database. “Dandelion”. Accessed on January 4, 2016. https://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/dandelion
  • Self-Nutrition Data.com. Raw Dandelion Greens- Nutrition Facts. http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2441/2
  • Whole Foods Market.com Dandelion Greens-No Common Weed! Accessed on January 4, 2016: http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/blog/whole-story/dandelion-greens-%E2%80%93-no-common-weed
  • González-Castejón, M., Visioli, F. & Rodriguez-Casado, A. “Diverse biological activities of Dandelion.” Nutrition Reviews. (Sept 01, 2012), 70,9: 534-547. Oxford University Press Journals. Accessed on Jan. 4, 2016. First published online: 1 September 2012.
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1753-4887.2012.00509.x
Dandelion Salad Recipe with Fresh Goat Cheese & Apples
  • Recipe Adapted from Mother Earth News. Roger Doiron (April/May 2008) http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/dandelion-salad-recipe-zmaz08amzmcc.aspx
Detoxification – Path to Greater Health – Part 2

Detoxification – Path to Greater Health – Part 2

Detoxing Boosts Your Health

Following a detox program suited to your personal needs supports the body’s natural cleansing process and boosts your health in many ways:

Allows digestive organs to rest

Stimulates the liver to process toxins more efficiently

Promotes movement of bowels

Improves circulation

Enhances sweating, which facilitates release of impurities

Restores vital nutrients and energy to the body

6 Things to Know Before You Detox

Before you begin a detox, prepare mentally and physically. Plan your dates a few weeks in advance. Inform the people closest to you about the time you’ve set aside to take care of yourself. Clear your schedule of routine obligations that may create stress. Stock up on inspirational music and reading material.

Gather Herbal Support. Herbal and nutritional supplements such as burdock, milk thistle, dandelion (see our post on delicious recipe), and vitamins C and B protect and support the body’s Detox Team, especially the liver. They also have antioxidant effects that benefit the whole body.

Hydrate! Without enough water, toxins will not be sufficiently flushed from the body. Aim to drink at least 2 quarts of water per day with lemon/lime during a detox.

Dry Brush Your Skin. Look for a brush with soft natural bristles. Begin with light, gentle brushing over the skin (don’t make the skin red). Always brush towards the heart. Shower immediately after to rinse off exfoliated skin.

Get Wet. Therapeutic use of water also supports detoxification. A steam or sauna can accelerate the release of toxins. Hydrotherapy provides support to the muscles and promotes relaxation. Mineral bath salts(Epson salt) also help release toxins.

Sweat it Out-Gently. Exercise facilitates digestion, circulation, metabolism and hormone balancing. During a detox, decrease the intensity of your usual exercise routine, but do break a moderate sweat. Get outdoors for fresh air and natural sunlight. Good exercise options are easy hiking, dancing, walking, yoga, or tai chi.

Rest. For your mind and body to fully assimilate the benefits of detoxing, you need good quality sleep. Plan your least stimulating activities (reading, meditation, bathing) for right before bed.

How to Detox?

There are many ways to approach detoxing, from fruit and vegetable juice fasts to herbal tea cleanses. A typical approach is a short period of fasting with proper fluid intake followed by whole or raw foods and beverages before resuming your usual daily routine. There are people who must be under the care of a health practitioner, such as people diagnosed with certain conditions such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease. In general, it’s important to work with your doctor to select a program that matches your health needs. Call our office if you would like a consultation or guidance how to improve your health. Here, at Healthy Wealthy & Wise Medical, P.C. we evaluate our patients through holistic and functional medicine understanding of health and balance of vital organs and system and prescribe a comprehensive treatment plan.

Food for Thought. . .

“We are shaped by our thoughts; we become what we think. When the mind is pure, joy follows like a shadow that never leaves.” – Buddha

References- Detoxification part 1 and 2
The following as cited in Pizzorno, Joseph E. (2013). Textbook of Natural Medicine. St. Louis, MO Elsevier. Jones, D.S., Quinn, S, et al. “Functional Medicine” (chapter 2), 10, 14-15 Lyon, M. “Functional Toxicology” (chapter 53), 483-484.Bland J.S., Barrager E., Reedy R.G., et al.”A medical food-supplemented detoxification program in the management of chronic health problems.” Altern Ther Health Med. (1995) 1:62-71.Cline, J.C., “Nutritional Aspects of Detoxification in Clinical Practice.” Altern Ther Health & Med. (2015) May-Jun, 21(3), p 54-62. PMID: 26026145. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26026145Wheelter, L. “Detox for Life: The Three Crucial Steps of the Detox Program.” Natural News.com Accessed on January 11, 2016. http://www.naturalnews.com/025899_detox_body_toxins.htmlJade, K. “Liver Detox Tea as Part of Your DIY New Year’s Detox Cleanse.” Natural Health Advisory Institute Online. Updated 1/1/2015. Accessed on January 11, 2016. http://www.naturalhealthadvisory.com/daily/natural-health-101/liver-detox-tea-as-part-of-your-diy-new-years-detox-cleanse/Lucille, Holly. “Do You Have a Toxic Workplace?” American Association of Naturopathic Physicians website. Accessed on January 11, 2016. http://www.naturopathic.org/article_content.asp?article=777Riordan Clinic. “Detox Cleansing to Remove Body Toxins.” Accessed on January 10, 2016. https://riordanclinic.org/2011/12/detox-natural-cleansing-to-remove-body-toxins/Jockers, D. “Dry Brushing to Detoxify Your Body.” Natural News.com. Accessed on January 11, 2016. http://www.naturalnews.com/040615_dry_brushing_lymphatic_system_detox.html#Dempster, John. “Top Five Daily Detox Tips that Work” Huffington Post. Accessed on January 6, 2016. http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/dr-john-dempster/detox-tips_b_6089736.htmlZeratsky, K. “Do Detox Diets Offer Any Health Benefits?” Mayo Clinic Online. Last updated March 2015. Accessed on January 11, 2016. http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-an