The Importance of Beta-Carotene

The Importance of Beta-Carotene

Beta-carotene has two important functions in the body: It functions as an antioxidant, protecting cells against damage, and it can be converted to Vitamin A (retinol), critical to maintaining skin and eye health.

Without beta-carotene, our bodies are unable to manufacture Vitamin A. And without sufficient Vitamin A, nearly all of our systems are at risk, including lungs, kidneys and immune function. Research shows that people who consume the necessary levels of beta-carotene are able to lower their risk for coronary artery disease, stroke, macular degeneration, and other age-related diseases.

You can get beta-carotene from a variety of foods:

  • Apricots
  • Asparagus
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Chinese cabbage
  • Yam/Sweet Potato
  • Spinach
  • Kale

The National Institutes of Health recommends a daily intake of 3,000 IU for adult men and 2,310 IU for adult women. For children, amounts vary according to age. While beta-carotene deficiency is rare in most industrialized countries, it can be difficult getting the recommended levels simply from food. That’s where supplements come in. In consult with your healthcare practitioner, design a plan that meets your individual needs. You may want to consider a supplement with a mixture of carotenoids, including beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lycopene, astaxanthin, lutein and zeaxanthin.

It’s possible to take too much beta-carotene. This is usually indicated by a yellowing of the skin, palms or soles and is known as carotenemia. Once consumption of beta carotene is reduced, this yellowing fades over time. As always, your best outcomes are achieved when working closely with your healthcare practitioner.

 

Elena Klimenko, MD, a certified functional medicine physician, will help you decide if Beta-Carotene is the right supplement for you. In her practice, she uses lifestyle modification and natural remedies to address the root cause of your medical symptoms. Call today to find out more about functional medicine and speak with Dr. Klimenko at 212-696- HEAL(4325).

 

References

  • MedicalNewsToday.com “What is Beta Carotene?” Accessed on March 30, 2016. http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/252758.php
  • National Institutes of Health. Vitamin A. Medical handout for health professionals. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminA-HealthProfessional/
  • MedlinePlus.com. “Beta Carotene”. Accessed on March 30, 2016. https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/999.html
  • Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Beta-carotene and other carotenoids. Dietary reference intakes for vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium, and carotenoids. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press; 2000:325-400. Accessed on March 30, 2016 http://www.nap.edu/read/9810/chapter/1
  • Bendich, A. “Functions and Actions of Retinoids and Carotenoids: Building on the Vision of James Allen Olson.” Jnl of Nutrition. (2004) American Society for Nutritional Sciences. Accessed on March 30, 2016. http://jn.nutrition.org/content/134/1/225S.full.pdf
  • van Poppel G, Spanhaak S, Ockhuizen T. Effect of beta-carotene on immunological indexes in healthy male smokers. Am J Clin Nutr. 1993; 57(3):402-407. Accessed on March 30, 2016 http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/57/3/402?related-urls=yes&legid=ajcn;57/3/402
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